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Yoga & Meditation

Implementing the use of yoga in clinical settings is a rapidly growing application, teaching people through their direct practice that they can be released from suffering impacted from substance abuse. At Enlightened Solutions, we have a spiritual space specifically designed for practicing yoga, meditation, and other healing arts.

We’re proud to offer our clients a mindful activity that can help them open up to yet another healing avenue of recovery, as they learn to explore the joy of yoga and meditation.

Benefits of Yoga in Addiction Treatment

In recovery, a regular yoga practice can help people develop the discipline needed to succeed in 12 step programs, which are often used as the primary referral, in conjunction with treatment for many substance users. The mindfulness practices and the slow, controlled breathing methods taught in yoga are tools to help curb impulse control and stressful feelings – something with which substance abusers struggle. Benefits of yoga and meditation include:

  • Feelings of calm and increased patience
  • Healing of the mind, body, and spirit
  • Release of muscle tension
  • Relief from stress, anxiety, and depression
  • Lowered heart rate, which lowers blood pressure
  • Clarity in thought processes
  • Learning to focus and be mindful of the body

Natural and Holistic Relief from Stress

Dedicated yoga practices empower our clients, providing them with real-world tools they can use on their own at any time, because yoga asanas (postures) and pranayama (breathing exercises) are readily accessible when sometimes a support person isn’t. Instead of turning to addictive substances to change thoughts and reactions in certain situations, they can apply yoga to address their stress and unhappiness, and find inner peace in critical moments. As clients learn the proper practice of yoga, they begin to learn the difference between pain and discomfort, and how to manage discomfort instead of avoiding it. They can fully control their experiences by modifying asanas in ways that feel good for them, finding the most helpful ways to apply this therapy to their overall recovery .

Before we begin a yoga session, we check in with our bodies, addressing any pain or issues we might have so that nothing is blocking us from fully absorbing ourselves in our practice. We sit quietly for a few moments and concentrate on the stillness in the room. As we sit in silence, we practice clearing the mind and focusing on the current feeling within us. Quieting the mind is a skill that takes consistent meditation practice to perfect. In addiction, the mind is constantly teeming with impulses and plotting how to get to the drug of choice, because the mind and body have been trained to need substances. If we can learn to control our mind, we can practice meditation in our daily lives to reign in those destructive thoughts. Through meditation, clients learn patience and how to find calm even during their toughest moments.

Brain Food: Yoga and Meditation

Practicing yoga and meditation together takes advantage of the brain’s neuroplasticity, which is often the characteristic that makes change so difficult. Depression, anxiety, stress, and other negative emotions activate the body’s nervous system, in addition to emotional regions of the brain. The body eventually settles into these patterns, and even if the mind has insight, the body will continue to activate these physiological patterns unless this insight is used. While traditional therapies work only with the mind, yoga works with the mind and body simultaneously, allowing for the embodiment of insights. (Social Work Today, Vol. 12 No. 5 P. 8.)

If you’re ready to find natural healing and balance in your mind, body, and spirit, call Enlightened Solutions at 844.234.LIVE to start your yoga and meditation practice today.